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THE WOMAN IN THE PHOTOGRAPH: A Novel by Dana Gynther
THE WOMAN IN THE PHOTOGRAPH: A Novel by Dana Gynther

Author Dana Gynther will be at Main library on Tuesday, August 25, 2015 from 6-7:30 pm for a “Reading and Signing” program. Mark your calendars!

www.danagynther.com

 

Review by Meagan Brown

As with books like The Paris Wife and The American Heiress, THE WOMAN IN THE PHOTOGRAPH: A Novel by Dana Gynther (Gallery Books; August 4, 2015; Trade Paperback) is a beautifully crafted portrait of a daring woman of her time: Lee Miller.  Though Lee gets her start as an assistant to the well-known photographer Man Ray, it doesn’t take her long to find her own path, and put her career above his own.

 

Dana Gynther is the author of Crossing on the Paris, and “proves herself a fine storyteller” (Kirkus).  Publishers Weekly says, “in Gynther’s capable hands, the Paris comes alive in historic detail.” Set in the romantic glow of 1920s Paris, Gynther again skillfully creates a historical setting and a creative, captivating look into the life of Lee Miller.

 

In Montparnasse 1929 model and woman about town Lee Miller moves to Paris determined to make herself known amidst the giddy circle of celebrated artists, authors, and photographers currently holding court in the city. She seeks out the charming, charismatic artist Man Ray to become his assistant but soon becomes much more than that: his model, his lover, his muse.

 

Coming into her own more fully every day, Lee models, begins working on her own projects, and even stars in a film, provoking the jealousy of the older and possessive Man Ray. Drinking and carousing is the order of the day, but while hobnobbing with the likes of Picasso and Charlie Chaplin, she also falls in love with the art of photography and finds that her own vision can no longer come second to her mentor’s.

 

THE WOMAN IN THE PHOTOGRAPH is the richly drawn, tempestuous novel about a talented and fearless young woman caught up in one of the most fascinating times of the twentieth century.

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